The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed. – Albert Einstein




Friday, January 30, 2015

ARR # 5 Period 5

What happens in spinal cord injury? Find out here. In the space below, leave a comment. You should react to the article AS WELL AS your classmates' comments. Feel free to pose questions that will invigorate the conversation.

19 comments:

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  2. This article was extremely enlightening for me. Prior to reading this, I was unaware of how important the spinal cord is in inducing many of the body's main functions, while working closely with the brain to do so. I found the potential ramifications of spinal cord injuries specifically threatening. In a single moment, a person may lose their abilities to walk or move their arms due to paralysis, and there is not a single treatment or surgery that can change that. Also, spinal cord injuries can make every day life strenuous, given that they can complicate and even prevent actions such as using the restroom and breathing from being carried out. I was also appalled by the fact that 24.5% of spinal injuries are inflicted by acts of violence; this number seemed dauntingly high to me. From this article I have taken away the fact that the spinal cord is a vital factor in every day life, and that it is imperative to avoid a spinal cord injury at all costs.

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    1. Jillian, I felt the same way after reading this article. It is crazy to think that so many Americans are currently suffering through this injury. It really made me think about how significant it is to take care of our bodies. Our bodies are so fragile and it only takes a matter of seconds before one can injure themself and end up living their life in agony. Also, the effects that a spinal cord injury can have on the rest of the body were appalling to me. I didn't realize how much damage a spinal cord injury could bring.

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    2. Jill and Aoife, i really see what you both see in this reading. i understood so much in how the spinal cord can be a dangerous part in your body and if you injury your spine it can have life threatening side-affects. i know learned that the spinal cord is nothing to joke about. i was most flattered with the development of how we treat people who have injured there spinal cords and how much of a change actually took place from early times to even today in the world we live in. always moving forward to improve and this article really motivated me to do more.

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  3. I could relate to this topic because I know someone who has experience this problem. My cousin's aunt dove into shallow water off of a wall and ended up injuring her spinal cord after hitting her head. She is now confined to a wheelchair since the injury caused paralysis. I agree with Jill and Aoife that the effects of a spinal cord injury are terrifying since it can cause so many complications throughout the body. It was frightening that 38.5% of spinal cord injuries happen during car accidents since this means that if I ever got into an accident I could potentially damage my spinal cord. I was particularly interested in the topic of spinal cord regeneration that was briefly mentioned in the article. It is amazing to me that developments are being made in healing these devastating injuries. I am curious about these developments in curing a spinal cord injury and would like to know more about them. -Mike

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  4. I agree with jill,aoife and mike that the effects of a spinal cord injury are terrifying since it can cause so many complications in ur body i know someone that just had surgery to do with their spinal cord like i did not even know that something like this could happened and could make your body have lots of pain what pop out to me was that 38.5% of spinal cord injuries happen during car accidents. so what this means is that if you are likely to get in a car accident you are going to hut your spinal cord

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  5. I agree with Jill, I always knew that the spinal cord was an important part of your body, but it never occurred to me just how vital it was. If you ever happen to injure your spinal cord, which is actually common, it threatens how you function as a whole. You could potentially be paralyzed or be unable to do things that people take for granted like walking up the stairs or brushing your hair, it can cause a lot of damage. I also agree with Mike, that it is really scary to think how one day you're just driving to school and the next thing you know you get into an accident and damage your spinal cord and your life is changed forever.

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  6. Going back to Justin's point, I think it's interesting how spinal cord injuries have been treated throughout time. Spinal cord injuries are debilitating enough with leaving people through paralysis for the rest of their life in the worst case scenarios but even today, those with disabilities of movement are treated significantly better than even 100 years ago, compared to 100s of years ago, methods to treat spinal cord injuries were barbaric at the least. Take for example, the World War II era mentality of leaving people in a wheelchair to die from breathing or blood clotting problems. I'm glad times have changed significantly and hope research for spinal cord regeneration continues efficiently to help those who struggle with the effects of spinal cord injuries.

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  7. Similar to the previous reactions I was baffled to discover the significance of the spinal cord, however I was also intrigued by the development of knowledge over time. It fascinates me how the knowledge of the spinal cord builds throughout history gradually, leading to what we know today. In addition, in lifeguarding class I learned the importance of ensuring the protection of the spinal cord. After a teenager damaged his spinal cord when he jumped off a bridge, my cousin (a lifeguard) was tasked with retrieving the boy from the water while keeping his neck still. Now, I understand why it is necessary to take these precautions because even the slightest damage can lead to a serious paralysis.
    Hannah Arlauskas

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  8. I agree with Aoife and Jill. It is crazy to think that such injuries can lead to spinal cord injury and can make a person paralyzed. There are many side effects to injuring your spinal cord. For example nerve cells sending signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the body is very important. It is also interesting to me that there is high amount of spinal cord injuries in the United States every year.

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  10. I agree that it's crazy that a spinal cord injury could lead to becoming paralyzed. I never realized how important the spinal cord was in order for our bodies to move. It's amazing on how our body is structured in order for us to function, and how the spinal cord sends signals from the brain throughout the whole body. It's shocking to know how easy someone could get a spinal cord injury, and that 38.5% of spinal cord injuries happen during car accidents, and 24.5% are from acts of violence. I also find it interesting that there is no way to treat a spinal cord injury, even with the advances in medical treatment we have today.

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  11. It is crazy how the spinal cord can cause paralyzation if it is damaged. I agree with Sarah that it is also crazy that it can never be repaired if injured. This cord has so much importance in the body since it brings signals to the brain.
    Kristen

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  12. I thought this article was interesting because I liked all of the stories about the different ways that spinal cord injuries were treated in ancient times like 1700 BC. I have known for a while that injuries to the "spine" are dangerous and can lead to paralysis but I had never read up on the subject before so I didn't understand the real reason why. This article answered some of my lingering questions. For example, I think this is the first time I really understood that the reason for paralysis is because of the value of the spinal cord. The spinal cord is the "main information pathway between the brain and the rest of the body," therefore any injury to it could be very severe. Like Mike, I found the topic of spinal cord regeneration very interesting. I am already familiar with the topic because I have heard a lot about the story of Eric Legrand. Eric Legrand was a college football player that suffered a very severe spinal cord injury playing football; he was left a paraplegic, but because of the new technology and research as well as advanced rehabilitation, he has been able to regain sensation in his body and movement in some body parts. [Video of hit that paralyzed EL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhRaRyTw1I0]. Legrand was told he had a 0-5% chance of being able to walk after the injury, but since then he has been able to regain some mobility in his lower legs. This is interesting for me because it relates to the idea that right now is the best time to get injured in all of history because there is so much better treatment and care available right now than ever before (infinitely better than the time when spinal cord injury meant certain death, but also improved significantly since just the late 1900s). It's amazing when you realize how far the medicine has come.

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  13. I was really fascinated by this article along with Jimmy's comment about the link to the video. from reading this article I was able to have some form of answered questions about the connection between our brain and the spinal cord. It really goes to show you that our own bodies hide more secrets than we realize our selves. one particular part of the article that really peaked my interest were axons that held our spinal cord together. i still have questions on the contents of how gray matter is infused with our spinal cord or how its created. however, overall this has opened my eyes in a whole new way that our bodies can perform and the growing process of spinal regeneration.

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  14. I agree with everybody that spinal cord injuries are seriously scary. They are nearly impossible to protect yourself from because they occur behind your cone of vision. I also recall Jimmy's story of the Rutgers football player Eric Legrand. Legrand suffered a freak accident sitting a football game and ended up paralyzed. The thought of being unable to move my lower extremities is horrifying and I will defiantly wear a seat belt. Now that some of my friends are getting their licenses, it is extremely important that I must wear my seat belt in order to ensure safety. I remember an accident in West Roxbury that paralyzed a kid I had met before. He was not wearing his seatbelt and went through the windshield. -Chris D

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  15. I agree with Chris that spinal chord injuries are scary, it is amazing how a quarter million people in the US suffer from some sort of spinal injury, and how 55 pct. of spinal chord injuries occur between 16 and 30 yrs old. It is crazy how certain accidents can really cause big spinal chord injuries as well - RJ

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  16. I agree with RJ and Chris that spinal cord injuries are dangerous to experience within one's lifetime. Those injuries could affect one pretty badly through blood clots, pain, and high blood pressure. After reading this article, I learned about an injury I barely knew about; this clarified my questions about this injury. This also showed how time has advanced with its technology to learn about an injury that people in the past barely knew about. It is vital to prevent this injury by being aware with oneself and get help immediately if one is becoming sick.
    -Natalia

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  17. I have to agree with people who say spinal cord injuries are scary. I think its very interesting to see the history behind the spinal cord and how everything happened. Something so simple has such horrible affects. I do like how the advancement in technology and research has helped people today with their spinal cord injuries.

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